Living in Rivendell

November 21, 2011

General

Living in Middle-Earth is a new column about non-playable character’s homes in Lotro. Each week we’ll discover a new location with a distinctive way of life and decoration style, looking at the little details we often pass by.

I was a bit apprehensive about my visit to Rivendell because it felt like something everyone already knew about. We’ve all been to visit Elrond so many times, how could the Last Homely House still impress me?

So I went, just because it was on my way to the Misty Mountains. And then something happened. I stopped and look, I mean really look. That was it: I fell in love with Rivendell a second time.

Let’s start by some obvious pieces. There are some nice tapestries up there that I would really like to have in my in-game house.

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Some beautiful Indian lamps.

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And a great set of furniture in dark wood and iron work. I’m a bit confused because we’ll see this design later in Moria. So really, who designed it first? The elves of the dwarves?!

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Notice the different wall paper in this room? This is Rivendell exclusive!

I’ve also noticed a couple of unique pieces of furniture, like this table and wall decoration. ScreenShot00013ScreenShot00012

But my favourite ones are definitely the bench and urns. ScreenShot00014

What is this? A new rug? Me want.

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Then we get in the core essence of the Last Homely House: its architecture. Oh my! All of Rivendell designs are strongly inspired by Art Nouveau, an aesthetic that I absolutely love. You can find it in its walls, ceiling and even statues.

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Amazing, right? Well, ok, given that Alphonse Mucha is one of my favourite artists of all time, I might be a little bit biased, hehe. But the fun doesn’t end here. Rivendell continues to blow us away with its stained glass art work:

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The details of the fireplace are awesome as well.

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And finally, , the cherry on top of it all, the ceiling in the Halls of Fire. Deep blue draped silk, hanging banners, starry painting on the arches: Drools.ScreenShot00005

Could they have made Rivendell more magical then this? I think not. So next time you’re passing by on a levelling alt, stop a second to admire the amazing features of Elrond’s home. Who knows, you may remember all of a sudden why you like Lotro so much :P

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Avatar of Kiarane

12 Responses to “Living in Rivendell”

  1. Avatar of Hildifast
    Hildifast Says:

    Wow. Its amazing how I’ve never really noticed (or appreciated) these beautiful details much, or enough, before. Great series Kia.

    Reply

  2. Thorongil Says:

    I’m guessing that the dark wood and iron furniture is from Hollin.
    Remember, Imladris (Rivendell) began as a hiding place for refugees from Hollin, and Hollin had extensive trade with Khazadum (Moria).
    Of course it is possible that the elves in Hollin got it from the dwarves rather than vice versa, but it looks to me like something a Noldo craftsman might come up with.

    Reply

  3. Baranwen Says:

    Oh, you’re right about the Art Nouveau influence. Those ladies on the fireplace looks like a painting from Mucha.
    We pass through the Last Homely House so often that we have forgotten to look all its beautiful details.
    I love the vitraux!

    Reply

  4. Cosmetic Lotro Says:

    Thank you Kia. Awesome and inspiring article again. I am a big fan of the Rivendell style and architecture as well and often hop into the Hall of Fire for no reason other than to look around. It is always breathtaking and never gets old. You made a wonderful compilation of all the intricate details. Great work!

    Reply

  5. Marolytrien Says:

    I’m still amazed by the fact that most people prefer to gather in simple/crude places like Bree and Galtrev. The detail and amount of beaty in Rivendell (and other Elven places) its just overwhelming! If only the dev team could remove those bridges (I always end up swimming when i try to play lotro in my poor laptop)….

    Reply

  6. Freyjuska Says:

    Last Homely House has been my favourite place to take screenshots since I first saw it, but I never noticed some of the details you did, Kia! Amazing!

    Reply

  7. susan Says:

    The first time I went to Rivendale I called my sister on Skype, made her sign on to the game and then I dragged her low level main to there and we both had a glorious time exploring and ooohing and ahhhhing. It’s one of the reasons we stayed to play LoTR.

    I remember most how everyone looked so grand in their maxed toons and outfits. We kept falling off the bridge cuz we were looking around and not at the path. lol

    good times….

    Reply

  8. Limm Says:

    Another great post, thanks!

    Reply

  9. mmicnova Says:

    i always loved those benches :)

    Reply

  10. Merrydew Says:

    You forgot the table cloths and candle stands in the Hall of Fire. I would love to have that in house. Some of the statues hold up a ring. The Homely House is the only place I can turn my graphics up to ultra high and I do so when I just want to look around so if you see a Hobbit staring at the walls in there don’t wonder what I’m going cause I am looking at the pretties.

    Reply

  11. Jonras Says:

    I love the style of rivendell. Pity all the good places are so far apart.
    love this series. Really makes you look as stuff you normally just run past.

    I actually have 5 Alphonse Mucha tapestries having in my home ( IRl, not Lotro’s ) and they are amazing!
    have the 4 season in my living room, and Ruby from the stones series.

    Also have a tapestry of Klimt’s “The Kiss”

    Reply

  12. Gilpharas Says:

    Kia, you did a great job at capturing views that most of us have missed. Really impressive artistry that the Elves (through Turbine) have decorated their home with. I’ve certainly not noticed most of these details, however, the overall effect of them does influence us, and the splendor of the view on first sight is very memorable. Still one of the most influential places in Middle-Earth.

    Great Article.

    Reply

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